Article in East Anglian Daily Times – 1 July 2015

Peace Palace backers share aim of spreading meditation message as works starts in Rendlesham

Jason Rookyard, Project Manager and Richard Johnson, National Director of the Transcendental Meditation Programme in England at the site of the Maharishi Peace Palace being built at Rendlesham.

07:45 01 July 2015 – Tom Potter

Jason Rookyard, Project Manager and Richard Johnson, National Director of the Transcendental Meditation Programme in England at the site of the Maharishi Peace Palace being built at Rendlesham.

Developers of a £3.5million meditation retreat being built in a Suffolk village are hoping the project will help spread their message of peace through the teaching of ‘collective consciousness’.

A Maharishi Peace Palace is going to be built in Rendlesham

Once complete, the Maharishi Peace Palace in Rendlesham will offer courses in transcendental meditation (TM), including consciousness-based education and natural health care known as AyurVeda.

The building will be a purpose-built successor to the TM Academy which operated for more than 25 years in Badingham, and will be the centrepiece of Rendlesham’s Garden Village – one of the largest Vedic architecture settlements of its kind.

The project is a first for the UK – with similar buildings in Ireland, Holland and Germany.

Permission was granted in 2008 for the Maharishi Foundation to develop a residential venue teaching the techniques of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi.

The site of the Maharishi Peace Palace being built at Rendlesham.

Richard Johnson, Rendlesham resident and national director of the foundation, said: “There is growing interest in yoga and we would like to bring out its fuller value by developing the consciousness of the individual – to feel more in tune with themselves and the cosmos, leading to a more creative and effective person.

“Our charity supports projects around the world – particularly in poorer countries. A by-product of our research is that, when a small group of people are practicing, it has a wider effect – an improvement on the environment.

“Everyone is searching for deeper understanding in order to meet the challenges of modern life. Once people find out more, they become more comfortable and realise it has a universal application. All we have done is use a law of nature that was always there.”

Former Foster and Partners architect D’Arcy Fenton is overseeing the project design, alongside local consultant John Renwick and project artist David Williams.

Jason Rookyard, project manager for construction company RG Carter, said: “We’re very pleased to have been chosen for the project.”

The 30-bedroom Peace Palace is expected to open in September 2016.